Getting your dream job - Jack Milgram

Getting your dream job [guest post + infographic by Jack Milgram]

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We all have dreams, and getting the perfect job is often one of them. Having your dream job means that you enjoy every minute of it, that everything you do brings only positive emotions, and that you also get paid for all of the aforementioned goodness. Naturally, finding such a job may not be that easy (unless you’re incredibly lucky, of course). But there are ways you can bring yourself closer to your dream. And we want to show you some of them.

Business etiquette [guest post by Ellie Summers]

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You know they say you have seven seconds to make a good first impression? And then there’s the other adage “First impressions last”. Combine these two and your first few moments during a business meeting become crucial to your future success. And this thought may cause you some anxiety. Are you adept at hiding this?
Left and Right Brain—The Surprising Truth [INFOGRAPHIC] by Jack Milgram

Re-engage the brain after the summer [infographic]

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At this point of September, almost all of us are back at work, hopefully recharged thanks to the summer holiday. To obtain the most from our restored brain we should deeply understand its way of performing, so I thought it could be a good idea to share the infographic created by Jack Milgram and his overview about the differences between right and left brain.
Designmantic - infographic

10 logo “must have”

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Sometimes – too often, actually – I come across a very badly designed trademark or logo. So, when I saw the infographic I’m going to share in this post, I couldn’t help but like it. Here you can find the 10 rules you should follow – or, better, you should assure your graphic design follows – when creating a logo or a trademark.
Personal brand infographic - universal microexpressions

Universal microexpression

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There are some things which one can distinguish from others, and around which it is possible to build a personal branding strategy, but there are other things where each is absolutely identical to all the others. This goes, for example, for some expressions - or rather microexpressions - which determine the "reading" of the emotions on a face from the interlocutors.